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PERFECT Carbonara Every Time | The "Scientific Carbonara" Recipe

Carbonara is one of the simplest Italian dishes. Don't be fooled by its simplicity, though, because it's often the least complicated dishes that are the hardest to master. A carbonara can easily become too soupy. Plus, many people are concerned about eating raw eggs in a traditional carbonara, even though the hot pasta pasteurizes them.


scientific-carbonara-recipe-sous-vide-spaghetti
The "Scientific Carbonara" Recipe | PERFECT Carbonara Every Time

To solve these problems, innovators such as Dario Bressanini have come up with more sophisticated methods for cooking the Roman classic. This method uses a sous vide to lightly cook the egg yolks in a water bath, resulting in a thick and creamy sauce that comes out perfectly every time. Be warned, though: the sous vide method takes an unattended hour to cook!


Watch the Pasta Grammar video where we make this recipe here:




Serves 2.


For this recipe, you will need:

- 2 oz. (55g) guanciale (cured pork jowl; if not available in your area, use pancetta)

- 2 egg yolks

- 1/2 cup (55g) grated pecorino and/or Parmigiano cheese

- Salt

- 5.5 oz. (160g) spaghetti or rigatoni pasta

- Fresh black pepper


Set up a sous vide water bath and bring up to 145 degrees F (63 C).


If using guanciale, trim off the tough outer skin. Cut the meat into 1/2-inch cubes and place in a large skillet over medium heat. If using pancetta, add a pinch of salt and pepper into the pan. Sauté for 4-6 minutes, or until deeply browned and crispy. Turn off the heat.



In a ziplock or vacuum-sealed bag, add the egg yolks, grated cheese, and two spoonfuls of the liquid guanciale fat from the pan. Squeeze the bag to lightly mix the ingredients, then press all the air out and seal it up. Place in the sous vide bath and cook for one hour.



As the eggs near completion, bring a large pot of water to boil and salt it. Add the pasta and cook as directed.


After one hour of cooking, drain the egg mixture into a bowl and whisk it vigorously until very smooth.



Drain the cooked pasta and transfer into a large mixing bowl. Add the egg mixture and stir all together. Finally, add the guanciale and a generous sprinkle of black pepper. Mix again, and serve immediately.



Buon appetito!



9 Comments


davidhunternyc
davidhunternyc
Feb 01

Is that spaghetti or bucatini? Thanks.

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metalchips2013
metalchips2013
Jan 24, 2022

After years of getting this wrong, last night I attempted to do it right. yet round one was a fail, the guanciale I had I believe was bad, it smelled and tasted horrible, like a pig fat rendering factory, not salty or peppery just a bad tasting and smell of rendered bad fat, I threw it away, and compounding this I had locatelly of all

brands for the cheese , it seems to not mix well at all, it was hard to get it creamy, i got this dish horribly wrong, anyone in the USA, know of a good Italian supply to get good pecorino and guanciale from? I want to do this correctly…

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metalchips2013
metalchips2013
Feb 02, 2022
Replying to

Got it, and it is yummy, guanciale was sent in for Italy, as well as dop pecorino, thank you eva and Harper!

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ilcorago
ilcorago
Jan 05, 2022

I'm so lucky there are Italian specialty shops in my neighborhood where I can get guanciale. How do you say MMMmmmmm! in Italian?


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finsecron
Aug 27, 2021

Made this last evening for me and the wife. OMG it was delicious and came out exactly as it was supposed to. I'll make it again in a few days because I have some unused rigatoni and pancetta left over.

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Filomena Masci-Wagman
Filomena Masci-Wagman
Aug 27, 2021

Your wife is amazing, the real deal when it comes to authentic Italian cooking. Her imagination to put ingredients together is BRILLIANT! Please keep publishing. Best of luck, success and health.

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